Friday, September 21, 2007

Gaming Graphic Design Contest

Well, this post is a slight departure from the Counter-Strike:Source Strategy Guide that I have been working on. I recently saw a news post at my fav. pro-gaming site about a graphic design contest that they are currently running. So I thought it was best to "support the arts" and get the word out that someone could take a quick break from their CounterStrike scrimming to win a few bucks by using their art skillz.

I'm pretty sure you don't have to enter every contest (but as long as you are doing one I guess you might as well do them all). If you were only to do one, I guess do the first one cause is pays more.

Here is the story from GetGosu:

Use your artistic talents to earn some cash!

www.GetGosu.com is launching a Three-Pronged Graphic Design Contest.

Enter one or all three categories and win up to $100 (100 USD).

The goal of each graphic is to get the message out that Gamers can get win REAL MONEY by playing their FAVORITE GAMES at www.GetGosu.com. Right now we are focusing on Counterstrike:Source (CS:S) and Half-Life 2:DeathMatch (HL2:DM) - so your graphics should too.

Direct submissions and any questions regarding submissions to: Bonus(at)GetGosu.com.

Submissions must be received by September 30th, 2007.

Graphic Contest #1: Pay-Out: $50 (50 USD paid via PayPal).
Shape: Small Square.
Size: 200h x 189v.
Goal/Message of Ad: Tell people they can win money by playing CounterStrike at www.GetGosu.com.
Suggested Ad Text: Win Money Playing Counterstrike at www.GetGosu.com.
Colors: See www.GetGosu.com for guidance. Not required.

Graphic Contest #2 : Pay-Out: $25 (25 USD paid via PayPal).
Shape: Banner.
Size: 468h x 49v.
Goal/Message of Ad: Tell people they can win money by playing CounterStrike at www.GetGosu.com.
Suggested Ad Text: Win Money Playing Counterstrike at www.GetGosu.com.
Colors: See www.GetGosu.com for guidance. Not required.


Graphic Contest #3 : Prize: $25 (25 USD paid via paypal).
Shape: Skyscraper.
Size: 120h x 578v.
Goal/Message of Ad: Tell people they can win money by playing CounterStrike at www.GetGosu.com.
Suggested Ad Text: Win Money Playing Counterstrike at www.GetGosu.com.
Colors: See www.GetGosu.com for Guidance. Not required.

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Part III of the Counter-Strike:Source Strategy Guide

I haven't posted in a few weeks as I have been on vacation. But, now I am back and am itching to play some Counter-Strike:Source. Since I'll inevitably be playing on a CS:S team with a few scrubs that will need my help; here is my latest installment of the Counter-Strike:Source Strategy Guide (Part III):

Counter-Strike:Source Strategy Guide Part III:

III. Room Breaching

There are a number of things that noobs continuously do wrong when it comes to breaching a room (moving through a doorway) in Counter-Strike.
a. They don't use flash-bangs.
b. They use flash-bangs in an uncoordinated manner and “team-flash.”
c. They don't time the breach with their teammates and or they enter the room by themselves.

In my opinion, not using a flash-bang is acceptable when:

a. You are 100% certain that the enemy is not in the room that you are entering.
b. You are relying on your speed as part of a flanking maneuver.

As far as team-flashing goes, most team-flashing in CS:S is caused by little kids that have nothing better to do but spawn and start using flashes. However, for those of us that aren't so easily entertained I would suggest that you make it standard practice that the second man (the man behind a crouching point-man) use the flash-bang (after all if you are the point-man you probably want to have a gun ready to fire).
I suggest that before entering the room the second man throws a flash-bang over the shoulder of the point-man, thereby the point-man is able to keep his weapon trained on the doorway in case the enemy should come through the doorway.
As far as working as team in a coordinated manner goes, take if from some real-life pros:
“When you move into a space to clear, you gotta have trust in the guy behind ya, because they cover the areas you can’t see and fire directly over your shoulder if a threat is posed,” said Pvt. Craig R. Putnam. “You have to know you can rely on them.”
Each member of the squad is assigned a “section of responsibility” or portion of the room for which they are responsible upon entry. The first and second men clear immediate threats, which are threats in the Soldiers’ direct line of sight when they enter.
The next set of Soldiers cover the first set by perusing all other areas that may hold secondary potential threats. These Soldiers move closely behind the first Soldiers, positioning their weapons on the shoulders of those in front as a safety precaution. They scan and identify high threats and assess “red zones,” which are objects in the room that the enemy may be able to hide behind, said Capt. Jared P. Wilson, C Company commander.
The team leader controls the movements of the squad throughout the maneuver, making the calls on what his Soldiers will do next based on his knowledge of their capabilities, Wilson said. The squad leader can position himself anywhere in the element to better control it and the mission, he explained.